Living Tea

Pilgrimage- Big Snow Mountain Old-Growth Sheng Puerh 2004 - 1.5 oz

With flavors of tangerine peels, woody potpourri, and sweet kindling, this tea stops you in your tracks and invites a deep breath. The Qi is strong and pervasive, the five elements are well-balanced, and the burnt-orange liquor speaks to the depth of the tea. Pilgrimage gained its name by bringing the drinker on a journey that is both exterior and interior. The strong sensory experience and opening quality of the tea draws one outward, while the full-bodied liquor and strong Qi of the tea move inward, quieting the mind. A deep, steady, and big tea like the place where the trees originally grew, Big Snow Mountain, one of the five mountains that all tea originated from. 

Da Xue Shan is a mountainous area located in Lincang, the southwest region of Yunnan Province. The peaks here rise to 3500 meters, and in the more remote regions, ancient tea trees are harvested by local tea farmers who protect their knowledge of the location of the wild teas. They gather the fresh tea leaves and bring them to small-scale factories for processing. Pilgrimage contains leaves from the elusive old-growth trees, evident in the strong Qi and patience of this truly special tea. 

The Lincang region is the northernmost of the three major tea areas in Yunnan. It is also the birthplace of all tea. The forests there have the oldest trees, and deepest roots in Cha Dao. There is some disagreement amongst scholars as to the origin of tea, but in traveling to the three major areas of Yunnan, we have found that the Lincang region is the home of all tea. Tea from this area has only blessed the market in modern times, though the aboriginals have been drinking this tea for millennia. The tea here is strong and deep, with sun, moon, mountain and air pouring through it. The area has the largest tea garden and the greatest tea output in Yunnan. Its Fengqing County has more than 906 acres of ancient tea plants and has produced tea for over 3,200 years. Throughout the Lingcang Region, the profound cultural connotations of tea, tea drinking and tea-related folk songs, specific to the area, are evident.